Two Verses to Pray Every Time You Open God's Word (Meditation on Psalm 119:17-18)

Does the Bible bore you? Are you unsatisfied with your times in God’s Word? Do you struggle to see any change in your life?

The Bible teaches us that we should be abiding in God and in His Word. It teaches us that we should meditate on His Word day and night. It teaches us to talk about it, teach it, see the world through it, and live according to it. But the Bible also tells us how we should come to God’s Word, what we should be looking for, and what it should do in us. In Psalm 119:17-18 we see these three things.

Dave Aubrey

Read More
Three Purposes of Sanctification (Meditation on Psalm 119:79-80)

Do you ever wonder why we have to go through the process of sanctification? Wouldn’t it be easier to just be sinless, or even go straight to heaven once we are saved? Well, we know that God is sovereign, and has purpose in all he does and ordains. We know that he has numbered our days before even one of them came to be (Psalm 139:16). That includes our days before conversion, and after. So, the question then becomes, what are the purposes of sanctification? I want to suggest three purposes, and we find them here in these two verses.

Dave Aubrey

Read More
Accepted in the Beloved (A Prayer from Psalm 119:12-14)

As I was reading and studying these verses to write this meditation, one question came to my mind; do you really desire this Jeremey? No matter how hard I tried to do my normal explanation, as I’ve done with previous meditations, I felt the need to repent and pray. Has this very thing ever happened to you? The tendency is to move too quickly past verses that convict us, rather than read the verses and pray over them. So here is my prayer of repentance to the Lord…

Jeremey Ashe

Read More
David AubreyComment
God's Well-trodden Path (Meditation on Psalm 119:15-16)

Have you ever had to walk a distance in the snow? It is easiest to walk a path that has been heavily tread, one in which the snow has already been compacted. The Psalmist writes that he will fix his eyes on God’s ways. The word “ways” is translated from orach, referring to a well-trodden path. This is a path walked by many and clearly visible; having been taken many times before, the outcome is predictable. God makes His ways clearly known to us through scripture, including the outcome for those who choose His well-trodden path. Think about the flattened snow path: you don’t have to lift your legs as high to walk, and you don’t sink down into the powder with every step. The compressed, well-trodden path will take you to your destination, using less energy. Christ has already done the hard work for you – He has fulfilled the law. His is the path you want to be on.

Courtney Ashe

Read More
David AubreyComment
God's Prescription for Killing Sexual Sin (Meditation on Psalm 119:9-11)

Imagine this with me. It is Sunday morning. The music team has just stepped down, the offering is being taken and your pastor steps up to begin the message. However, before he dives into the text, he makes an announcement that at the conclusion of today’s service everyone will need to exit the building in a timely fashion. He explains that your church has rented out its space to be used by another group that day. He continues to explain that in order to help with some financial issues in the church they are opening up their doors for other groups to utilize your space, and today after service, a group will come in to hold a service for the worship of… themselves. This group will sing songs that make them happy. They will hold on to their money. They will praise each other and seek to exalt themselves. They will participate in anything that will further their kingdom. There will be acts of self-worship during this service like sexual relations, cursing, anger outbursts, coveting, laziness, slandering etc. 

Dave Aubrey

Read More
Meditation on Psalm 119:77-78

Growing up my mom used to tell me, “It takes two to fight,” when arguments broke out among my siblings and me.  She was trying to teach me that I bear some of the responsibility for the discord. Even if they were attacking me unjustly I was accountable for my response. I thank God for a good godly mother that was responding to me biblically. She was using the tender mercy that the Psalmist calls on God to have for him in verse 77. That gut feeling of compassion that a parent has for their child. A good English equivalent would be having “a heart of compassion”. That mercy doesn’t just protect, but also points out flaws and ways to improve through rebuking and teaching.

Kaylene Hooper

Read More
Giving Thanks in Every Circumstance

If our thanksgiving is based on circumstances, then when our comfort, our homes, and our health all fade, so does our thanksgiving. This is the way the world works, but not Christians. God’s will is that in all circumstances we give thanks. We have a treasure, and inheritance, that is guaranteed and sealed (Ephesians 1:13-14). Even if we lose everything we own, the One who owns us will never lose us. This alone is worth giving thanks! As believers we know that our best life comes later, and that isn’t because heaven is full of the joy of stuff, but rather full of the joy of Christ (Psalm 16:11). May we say like Asaph “Whom have I in heaven but you? And there is nothing on earth that I desire besides you” (Psalm 73:25).

Dave Aubrey

Read More
Meditation on Psalm 119:7-8

The Psalmist presents two aspects of praising God, “I will praise you with an upright heart, when I learn your righteous rules. I will keep your statutes; do not utterly forsake me” (Psalms 119:7-8).  One side deals with the external (the method of praising God through obedience), and this is what people see. However, the other side deals with the internal (the uprightness of our hearts), and this is what God sees. As said by a commentator, “he (the psalmist) did not want to offer God the image of praise or a moment of praise when the rest of his life was not upright”, this is the challenge to all of us as worshippers of God. Our wonderful assurance is that God sees us through Jesus’ life and sacrifice, and that is what truly matters.

David Edillon

Read More
David AubreyEdillonComment
Who Do You Perceive God to Be? (A Meditation on Psalm 119:75-76)

Who do you perceive God to be? In his book, “The Knowledge of the Holy,” A.W. Tozer famously observed, “What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us…the most portentous fact about any man is not what he at a given time may say or do, but what he in his deep heart conceives God to be like.”

Perhaps you are experiencing a momentary disappointment or what seems to be an unending season of trial. By God’s grace, resist the temptation to allow your circumstances to interpret who God is for you. Instead, pray that God would grant you grace to abide and delight in the knowledge of who the Sovereign, eternal Creator has revealed Himself to be in His Word. And, as His servant, receive the comfort He has promised in Christ. 

Ellen Melnick

Read More
sufferingDavid AubreyComment
Are You Canonically Challenged? (Meditation on Psalm 119:4-6)

The psalmist prays, “Oh that my ways may be steadfast in keeping your statutes” (verse 5). The same God who commands is also the same God who has provided the means and the power to obey his commands, by giving us a heart of flesh. Looking forward to the new covenant, we read “And I will give you a new heart, and a new spirit I will put within you. And I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my Spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes and be careful to obey my rules” (Ezekiel 36:26-27).  Paul, speaking of the Spirit of Christ who has been given to the believer, tells us that “the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the spirit” (Romans 8:1-4). 

Joose Dotson

Read More
Meditation on Psalm 119:73-74

Too many Christians live defeated lives. They live enslaved to their sin, as if sanctification is a lost cause (at least in a specific area of their life). Even worse, they fear falling away from the faith completely. Is this the message of the gospel? Paul called those in Galatia who struggled with this fools! Not because they struggled with sin, but because they thought it was up to them to defeat it! Paul asks, “Who has bewitched you?” then he says, “Did you receive the Spirit by works of the law or by hearing with faith? Are you so foolish? Having begun by the Spirit, are you now being perfected by the flesh?” (Galatians 3:1-4). In other words, we must realize that not only were we saved completely by God’s grace, but we are sanctified completely by God’s grace. God has put His own name on the line as the guarantee. He will surely do it! 

Dave Aubrey

Read More
David Aubrey Comment
Meditation on Psalm 119:47-48

The Psalmist is engaged in actively pursuing God. He says “I find” my delight which implies that he is involved in seeking out something. He is seeking with a purpose, which is to discover something that he is invested in. He is seeking out those things “which he loves.” Those things which he loves so much that they bring him “delight.” Jesus teaches us what should be the proper inclination of the heart (what we should love) in Luke 12:33-34. “Sell your possessions, and give to the needy. Provide yourselves with moneybags that do not grow old, with a treasure in the heavens that does not fail, where no thief approaches and no moth destroys. For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”

Mark Kielblock

Read More
David AubreyComment
Meditation on Psalm 119:45-46

The very thing that our flesh is often tempted to view as restricting is the same thing that offers us our freedom. Through the word of Christ we are free to do what is right, no longer bound by sin. Freedom implies a want (desire) to do these things and the next two verses affirm this as the Psalmist states twice that he loves the commandments (Psalm 119:47-48). We are free to live the way we were created to live, and we are able to do it willingly. 

Paula Richard

Read More
David AubreyComment
Proper Perspective in Affliction (Meditation on Psalm 119:71-72)

Affliction Is not a word that we normally think on or equate with ‘good.’ This verse is startling because the psalmist says that he was afflicted and it is good for him. The affliction here was in the past, and in this backward look the psalmist sees that it yielded something for his present, and future. ‘It is good for me’ he says. How can affliction be good? 2 Corinthians 4:16-17 says it this way, “So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison.”

Hannah Harvath

Read More
A Deep Confidence in Daddy (Meditation on Psalm 119:43-44)

Sometimes, off in a distant room I can hear my children quietly saying to one another, “Daddy told me that I could”, and with bold confidence they proceed to tell their uninformed sibling the “new rule” according to daddy.  Have you been there as a parent perhaps?  I must admit, it’s cute and can be funny listening to them.  For my kids, their hope in my rules run very deep, and their confidence is strong.  They know that if they’re taunted or wronged, I will come to the rescue and uphold my own word to their accuser… even if that’s simply to help them settle a score with their brother or sister over who gets to play with a certain toy!  It is in these fleeting moments as a parent, I see a much deeper glimpse of our Father in heaven.  

Brandon Harvath

Read More
David AubreyDaddyComment
Meditation on Psalm 119:41-42

The Psalmist reminds us something we need to remember. Salvation is of the LORD. We need to remember that we must rely on the mercy of God through his steadfast love for our salvation. The Psalmist correctly puts the order of events in terms of cause and effect. The cause of our salvation is God’s gracious steadfast love. We are not the cause. The cause is God. 

Jeremey Ashe

Read More
David AubreyComment
Smeared With Lies (Meditation on Psalm 119:69-70)

There is a cost to being a true Christian in this world. There is a cost to delighting in and obeying and God’s law. History has shown this over and over again, as well as the text in front of us. We see that the insolent, or less specifically the unbeliever, has a negative response to the psalmist and his righteous behavior. I believe there are many reasons for this but we are going to focus on just one.

Joose Dotson

Read More
David AubreySmearedComment
Meditation on Psalm 119:55-56

The word night doesn’t always symbolize damnation or turning away from God. NIGHT IS A TIME TO TURN TO GOD! I have often taken my worries, my problems and my fears to bed with me.  Like Job, I have felt like “the night is long, and I am full of tossing till dawn (Job 7:3-4).” A few times, I felt like David who said, “All night I make my bed swim—I drench my couch with my tears (Ps 6:6).”  No matter what burdens you or bothers you, night can be a time of spiritual devotion.

Jeff Osgood

Read More
David AubreyComment
Meditation on Psalm 119:53-54

The Psalmist is not mincing words here. He says that there is a horror that is coming upon him like a bitter negative 20 degree wind in Liverpool, NY. It is chilling to the bone. But it doesn’t just come and go. The word implies (as stated before) a famine. Well, when someone is starving, typically you don’t go through waves of hunger, but rather you are constantly filled with an unquenchable knot in your stomach that longs for food. This is what is happening here. The Psalmist has this fierce, bitter, and unending wind of fear and hatred gnawing at his soul.

Dave Aubrey

Read More
David AubreyComment
Prone to Wander (Meditation on Psalm 119:67-68)

The psalmist knew the importance of prioritizing time spent in God’s word as a way to keep him from wandering. At first glance on the word “astray” in verse 67, it might appear as though he had strayed from God in an act of willful rebellion. However, the Hebrew word translated astray here (shagag) means “ to commit an error, to sin inadvertently.”  In other words, the psalmist was unaware that he was straying. But God, in His immeasurable grace, allowed a humbling of some kind to awaken him to his wandering and his need to return to his Creator. 

Ellen Melnick

Read More